Pi Day Pies

By Julie Oakes Happy Pi Day! How does one celebrate such a day? We history nerds are not usually also mathematically inclined, so creating elegant equations doesn’t seem festive enough. The solution is to comb through vintage recipes and…..make pie! Everyone is familiar with the usual sort of pie, like apple, cherry, lemon meringue and…

We All Scream for Ice Cream By Julie Oakes

February 3 is known as “Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day”, and thus a very fitting day to honour the memory of an extraordinary cook and entrepreneur, who elevated ices and ice cream to a whole new level in the late 1880s, and yet is almost unknown today. Agnes Bertha Marshall might be described as…

Bannock

Many guests at the “Party in the Park with Tom Thomson” asked for the recipe for our bannock. There are many variations of this versatile bread; here’s the one we most often use. Bannock 3 cups all purpose flour 2 tbsp baking powder 1 tbsp sugar 1 tsp salt 2 tbsp shortening 2 cups water…

The Beef Ring Barn

By Guest Blogger, Gwen Tuinman Today, many families overcome economic barriers to attaining healthy and reliable food sources through innovative collaborations within their communities. The earliest settlers of Upper Canada frequently partnered with others to solve challenges. They provide us with admirable examples of how cooperative strategies can overcome the greatest obstacles to survival. I…

Elizabeth Lount’s Open Letter

The picture of Elizabeth Lount pleading for her husband’s life with the Governor of Upper Canada is well known, but her letter after Samuel Lount’s death is not as famous. On June 12, 1838, Mrs.  Lount published, in the Pontiac Herald in Michigan, this open letter to John Beverley Robinson, Chief Justice of Upper Canada….

Fashion: Substance and Style! By Julie Oakes

In preparing notes for the fashion show which formed a part of the Journey to Confederation Youth Fair, it struck home that the popular perception of fashion is that it is a frivolous pastime for the wealthy and has no relevance to the “real world”.  In fact, changes in fashion usually reference what is happening…

Tea for Two…or more!

by Helena Turner Afternoon tea is such a lovely way to spend an afternoon with family and friends; elegant sandwiches, delicious scones with home-made jam, and an assortment of dainty sweets served with piping hot tea and a smile, can be such a relaxing experience. The whole idea of afternoon tea is said to have…

Claremont United Church Quilt

Written by Gabrielle Untermann (Reprinted from the Pickering Township Historical Society’s “Pathmaster” newsletter, with permission from the author and the Society.) Soon after Rev. Rob Selby became our minister at Claremont United Church in 2010, I was helping him sort through a bookcase in the sanctuary when we came across a small, antique glove box.  Inside was an embroidered quilt…

Early Black Settlers in Pickering Township

Written by Julie Oakes (based on Pickering Museum Village research) The Chapman family is the earliest known Black family residing in Pickering as early as 1831.  George Chapman, likely born around 1790 in Virginia, was a former slave who fled to Canada sometime before 1830. Census records illustrate that George Chapman was a labourer married to Katharine Chapman, an Irish Catholic….

Vintage Victuals Victorious!

  by Helena Turner Words cannot really express how happy and excited seven volunteer cooks from PMV are feeling right now! We have had a marvellous day at Fort York’s Mad for Marmalade event and return to our museum thrilled at our hat trick win today. Hat trick as in- this is the third year…